Victoria and Albert Museum

Victoria and Albert Museum
Cromwell Road
South Kensington
London
Greater London
SW7 2RL
England

Website

www.vam.ac.uk

E-mail

vanda@vam.ac.uk

Telephone

Events Bookings

020 7942 2211

Exhibitions Bookings

020 7907 7073

Fax

020 7942 2266

All information is supplied by the venues or providers themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.
The V&A Courtyard
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The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) is the world’s greatest museum of art and design.

Venue Type:

Museum

Opening hours

Daily 10.00-17.45
Friday 10.00-22.00

Closed: 24-26 December

Admission charges

Admission free
There may be a charge for some special exhibitions and events

Getting there

London Underground (The Tube): The V&A is a five minute walk from South Kensington underground station (on the Piccadilly, Circle and District Line). South Kensington is a five minute tube journey from Victoria, ten minutes from Covent Garden and Leicester Square and 15 minutes from King's Cross St Pancras.

The V&A is a ten minute walk from Knightsbridge underground station (on the Piccadilly Line). Knightsbridge is a ten minute tube journey from Covent Garden and Leicester Square and 15 minutes from Kings Cross St Pancras.

Bus: Buses C1, 14, 74 and 414 stop outside the Cromwell Road entrance. The Open Tour stop outside the Museum as part of their Double Decker Bus site-seeing tour of London.

Additional info

See website for details

The Victoria and Albert Museum's collections span two thousand years of art in virtually every medium, from many parts of the world, and visitors to the museum encounter a treasure house of amazing and beautiful objects. The Museum was established in 1852, following the enormous success of the Great Exhibition the previous year. Its founding principle was to make works of art available to all, to educate working people and to inspire British designers and manufacturers.

The Museum's ceramics, glass, textiles, dress, silver, ironwork, jewellery, furniture, sculpture, paintings, prints and photographs now span the cultures of Europe, North America, Asia and North Africa, and date from ancient times to the present day.

Although the V&A's collections are international in their scope, they contain many particularly important British works - especially British silver, ceramics, textiles and furniture.

Part of the RIBA Trust's British Architecture Library, a Designated Collection of national importance, is on display at this museum.

The collection provides comprehensive coverage of all aspects of architecture. It is fundamental to the study of architecture in Britain and is nationally and internationally significant.

Items from this collection

Collection details

World Cultures, Weapons and War, Toys and Hobbies, Social History, Photography, Personalities, Performing Arts, Music, Fine Art, Design, Decorative and Applied Art, Costume and Textiles, Archives, Architecture, Archaeology

Key artists and exhibits

  • The British Galleries 1500-1900 tell the story of British design from the Tudor age to the Victorian era. Fifteen completely refurbished galleries are filled with exhibits reflecting all of the top British designers of the times. The galleries are enhanced by computer interactives, objects to handle, video screens and audio programmes. Highlights include the gigantic Great Bed of Ware (mentioned in Shakespeare's Twelfth Night) and the wedding suit worn by James II. Inspirational, beautiful and unmatched in scope, the British Galleries offer an entirely new visitor experience in a stunning and innovative setting.
  • Designated Collection
Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Jardin de Paris

NEW COURSE: Art and the City, Ancient to Modern

  • 22 September 2014 — 13 July 2015

(3 terms) 11.00-15.30

Many celebrated artists have been closely associated with major European and American cities, often making the city itself a subject of their work. From ancient Athens and Rome to New York, via Renaissance Florence, late 19th century Paris and interwar Berlin, cities have long been centres for artistic communities and movements.

The course will examine case studies on ancient Athens and Rome, medieval visions of the city, Renaissance Florence, Rome and the Baroque, Paris and Impressionism, Berlin and the inter-war period, New York and the Abstract Expressionists, as well as considering the development of the art world and artistic communities in cities such as London and Barcelona. Major figures like Raphael, Titian, Manet, Picasso, Dali, Pollock and Warhol will be considered as well as critics, dealers, patrons and lesser-known artists, designers and architects.

Admission

£1,750 per year, £1,400 concessions
£730 per term, £550 concessions
£60 per day, £45 concessions

Website

http://www.vam.ac.uk/whatson/event/3453/art-and-the-city-ancient-to-modern-4921/

The Virgin and Child, statuette in carved boxwood, by Viet Stoss, German, early 16th century

Late Medieval to Early Renaissance 1250–1500

  • 23 September 2014 — 7 July 2015

(over 3 terms), 11.10-15.30

Examine the visual arts in an era of profound cultural, intellectual and social change. Chart important stylistic developments from High Gothic to the renaissance revival of classical antiquity, the rise of realistic representation and the emergence of artistic personalities.

Consider patterns of patronage: the collective enterprise of the great gothic cathedrals, the magnificence of princes and popes, and the growing spending power of the middle classes. Discover how the arts were affected by devotional practices and by humanist scholarship, and investigate the materials and techniques involved in artistic production. Study the work of well-known painters, sculptors and
architects from Giotto to Leonardo da Vinci alongside the decorative arts, including tapestry, stained glass, goldsmiths’ work and maiolica, all superbly represented in the V&A’s acclaimed Medieval and Renaissance Galleries.

Course Director: Dr Paula Nuttall

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

£1,750 per year, £1,400 concessions
£730 per term, £550 concessions
£60 per day, £45 concessions

Website

http://www.vam.ac.uk/whatson/event/3458/late-medieval-and-early-renaissance-1250-1500-1415-4926/

Bracket clock

High Renaissance to Baroque: 1500 – 1720

  • 24 September 2014 — 8 July 2015

(over 3 terms), 11.10-15.30

Explore the art, architecture and decorative arts of Europe from the High Renaissance to Baroque, focusing on Italy, France, Germany, the Netherlands and England. It will include the work of some of Europe’s most celebrated artists and architects, such as Michelangelo, Bernini, Wren, Rembrandt and van Dyck. During this period the Renaissance filtered through from Italy, affecting all the arts.

The invention of printing meant that books and prints reached a new and wider audience, and quickly popularised new styles. At the same time the Reformation wrought havoc with the established order and a century of war and revolution followed. In some parts of Europe iconoclasm meant the destruction of religious art, and by the mid 17th century Europe was divided into Roman Catholic and Protestant states.

The course examines changes in patronage, with the rise of a prosperous middle class wanting portraits and genre paintings as well as consumer goods such as maiolica and textiles; it considers the effect of wars and economic policies on the production of art, metalwork and furniture, and the influence of trading voyages on imports of luxury goods from the East.

Course Director: Dr Kathy McLauchlan

Admission

£1,750 per year, £1,400 concessions
£730 per term, £550 concessions
£60 per day, £45 concessions

Website

http://www.vam.ac.uk/whatson/event/3459/high-renaissance-to-baroque-1500-1750-1415-4927/

home, 1914

The Shadow of 1914: British Architecture and Design, 1900-25

  • 22 November 2014 10:30am-5:30pm

CONFERENCE: For one hundred years, the architecture of Britain in the decades either side of 1914 has been neglected by scholars and largely viewed in negative terms.

Based on the fact that 1914 acts as the chronological division point between the coverage of the Victorian and Twentieth Century Societies, this one-day conference presented jointly by the two societies aims to set out the stylistic tendencies of the time, plus wider movements in design and urbanism. It will cast light into the shadows that have lain over the period for so long.

Suitable for

  • 18+

Admission

£65.00 including lunch, £45.00 excluding lunch, students £55.00 including lunch, £35.00 excluding lunch.

Website

http://www.vam.ac.uk/whatson/event/3386/the-shadow-of-1914-british-architecture-and-design-1900-192-4831/

Resources listed here may include websites, bookable tours and workshops, books, loan boxes and more. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all.

Architectural Style

http://www.vam.ac.uk/vastatic/microsites/architecture/style_level1.php?id=0

Website with pictures and descriptions of a broad range of architectural styles, historical and contemporary Western, Asian and Islamic. There is also an interactive Style Quiz.

Getting there

London Underground (The Tube): The V&A is a five minute walk from South Kensington underground station (on the Piccadilly, Circle and District Line). South Kensington is a five minute tube journey from Victoria, ten minutes from Covent Garden and Leicester Square and 15 minutes from King's Cross St Pancras.

The V&A is a ten minute walk from Knightsbridge underground station (on the Piccadilly Line). Knightsbridge is a ten minute tube journey from Covent Garden and Leicester Square and 15 minutes from Kings Cross St Pancras.

Bus: Buses C1, 14, 74 and 414 stop outside the Cromwell Road entrance. The Open Tour stop outside the Museum as part of their Double Decker Bus site-seeing tour of London.