The National Archives

Front entrance of The National Archives
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The National Archives is the official archives and publisher for the UK Government, and for England and Wales. We work to bring together and secure the future of the public record, both digital and physical, for future generations.

The National Archives is open to all, offering a range of activities and spaces to enjoy, as well as our reading rooms for research. Many of our most popular records are also available online.

Website: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk
Twitter: @UKNatArchives
Facebook: The National Archives

Venue Type:

Archive

Opening hours

Tuesday 09:00 - 19:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 19:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00
Saturday 09:00 - 17:00

Closed Sunday and Monday

Admission charges

Free

Archives of the British government covering over a thousand years of world history and all seven continents from Arctic explorers and Middle Eastern embassies to papal bulls and the photographic collections of Colonial administrations.

Collection details

Weapons and War, Trade and Commerce, Social History, Photography, Maritime, Law and Order, Archives

Key artists and exhibits

  • Domesday Book
  • Magna Carta
  • Declaration of Independence
  • Valor Ecclesiasticus
  • Victorian photographs
Events details are listed below. You may need to scroll down or click on headers to see them all. For events that don't have a specific date see the 'Resources' tab above.
Palaeography

Reading old documents: Introduction to Medieval and Tudor palaeography

  • 28 June 2017 6-7pm

** Please note: This webinar is an online only event**

Reading old documents: Introduction to Medieval and Tudor palaeography

In this series of three monthly webinars, you will learn the basic skills required to read handwriting from the past, and discover some tips and tricks to help you get to grips with original documents.


Over the course of the series, you will have the opportunity to discover some of the unique historical documents in our collection, including a widow’s will from the 15th century, legal records from the Star Chamber (one of the most powerful courts in Tudor England) and an inventory of Thomas Cromwell’s house.

All documents will be in English, no knowledge of Latin is required.


This is the second instalment of a three-part series.

The first and second parts of this series can be found here:

Part one - https://www.eventbrite.com/e/webinar-reading-old-documents-introduction-to-medieval-and-tudor-palaeography-tickets-32439281765?aff=culture24

Part two - https://www.eventbrite.com/e/webinar-reading-old-documents-introduction-to-medieval-and-tudor-palaeography-tickets-32440379047?aff=culture24

** Please note: This webinar is an online only event**

Where

Online

Admission

This is a free online event.

** Please note: This webinar is an online only event**

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/webinar-reading-old-documents-introduction-to-medieval-and-tudor-palaeography-tickets-32440403119?aff=culture24

Venereal disease and the First World War

Fears of unrestrained vice: Venereal disease and the First World War

  • 24 May 2017 1:30-3:30pm *on now

The Venereal Disease Act of May 1917 prohibited treatment of VD by unqualified persons. During the war, the spread of disease was crippling the British armed forces, with women’s sexuality being increasingly policed at home.
Find out how VD was prevented and treated during the war - as well as society’s changing attitudes towards disease and sexual practice - using original documents from our collection.

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/fears-of-unrestrained-vice-venereal-disease-and-the-first-world-war-tickets-32464245432?aff=culture24

Palaeography

Webinar - Reading old documents: Introduction to Medieval and Tudor palaeography

  • 24 May 2017 6-7pm *on now

** Please note: This webinar is an online only event**

Reading old documents: Introduction to Medieval and Tudor palaeography

In this series of three monthly webinars, you will learn the basic skills required to read handwriting from the past, and discover some tips and tricks to help you get to grips with original documents.


Over the course of the series, you will have the opportunity to discover some of the unique historical documents in our collection, including a widow’s will from the 15th century, legal records from the Star Chamber (one of the most powerful courts in Tudor England) and an inventory of Thomas Cromwell’s house.

All documents will be in English, no knowledge of Latin is required.

This is the second instalment of a three-part series.

The first and third parts of this series can be found here:

Part one - https://www.eventbrite.com/e/webinar-reading-old-documents-introduction-to-medieval-and-tudor-palaeography-tickets-32439281765?aff=culture24

Part three - https://www.eventbrite.com/e/webinar-reading-old-documents-introduction-to-medieval-and-tudor-palaeography-tickets-32440403119?aff=culture24

** Please note: This webinar is an online only event**

Where

Online

Admission

This is a free online event.

** Please note: This webinar is an online only event**

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/webinar-reading-old-documents-introduction-to-medieval-and-tudor-palaeography-tickets-32440379047?aff=culture24

What was life like in the swinging sixties

Family event – What was life like in the swinging sixties?

  • 30 May 2017 10:30am-12pm

Join us in our Keeper’s Gallery to explore what life was like in the 1960s.
We’ll be delving into our collection of original documents to find out more about fashion, music and culture in this famous decade, before taking part in a creative activity led by our Education team.
Adults do not need to book for themselves.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/family-event-what-was-life-like-in-the-swinging-sixties-tickets-32464286555?aff=culture24

The English King of Spain that never was

Webinar – The English King of Spain that never was

  • 31 May 2017 6-7pm

** Please note: This webinar is an online only event**

The tale of how the son of Edward III, John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster laid claim to, and attempted seizure of, the throne of Castile (Spain) by force for himself, his dynasty and country is a fascinating but unknown chapter in English medieval history.
If successful, Gaunt’s ambition would not only elevate his own prestige and power but also transform England’s ruling dynasty into the dominant power in Western Europe.
Set against the backdrop of the turbulent Hundred Years War conflict in the later fourteenth century, this webinar aims to explore the story with the aid of various diplomatic and administrative records held at The National Archives.
Webinars are online only events

** Please note: This webinar is an online only event**

Where

Online

Admission

This is a free online event.

** Please note: This webinar is an online only event**

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/webinar-the-english-king-of-spain-that-never-was-tickets-32464393876?aff=culture24

Look out_theres a mini beast about

Family event – Look out, there’s a mini-beast about!

  • 2 June 2017 10:30am-12pm

What does The National Archives have to do with bugs? In this session, children will have the opportunity to find out about some of our famous records and the problems that bugs can cause for an archive.
Join us on a ‘Bug Hunt’ in our beautiful grounds, before creating your very own bug!
After the session, there will be a chance to speak with members of our Collection Care team and take a look at some bug specimens in very close detail!
Adults do not need to book for themselves.

Suitable for

  • Family friendly

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/family-event-look-out-theres-a-mini-beast-about-tickets-32464762980?aff=culture24

Crown and rebellion in thirteenth century England

Crown and rebellion in thirteenth century England

  • 8 June 2017 6-8pm

800 years ago, a royal army led by the ageing chivalric hero William Marshal defeated a force of French and English baronial troops under the captaincy of the heir to the throne of France.
One of the most important ever fought on English soil, this battle, which took place in uphill Lincoln on 20 May 1217, effectively ensured that England would not become a cadet kingdom of France and that the Norman and Angevin settlement of England could be consolidated and the liberties enshrined in Magna Carta – so recently granted – revised and consolidated.
Come and hear three renowned medieval historians discuss the battle and some of the key people involved, including the Marshal, Nicholaa de la Haye, female castellan of Lincoln and sheriff of Lincolnshire. Find out how England recovered from the Magna Carta crisis transforming into a parliamentary state and military powerhouse at this free panel event.

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/crown-and-rebellion-in-thirteenth-century-england-tickets-32465087952?aff=culture24

Beyond what the naked eye can see_Victorian Britain on film

Beyond what the naked eye can see: Victorian Britain on film

  • 8 June 2017 10:30-11am, 11:30am-12pm, 12:30-1pm, 2-2:30pm, 3-3:30pm, 4-4:30pm

As part of a collaborative project with the British Film Institute, a mobile heritage laboratory from University College London will be visiting The National Archives this June.
Conservators and conservation scientists will explain their work with collections of film and photographs. These materials pose particular challenges as they are often inherently fragile, with significantly shorter life expectancies than some of our oldest paper and parchment records.
Attendees will be invited to handle film and photographs in different states of deterioration and to ask questions about how best to care for these materials. Our innovative research will be explained though practical, hands-on demonstrations of techniques including optical microscopy, polarising filters, ultraviolet radiation and chemical spot tests.

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/beyond-what-the-naked-eye-can-see-victorian-britain-on-film-tickets-32464899388?aff=culture24

Gothas over England

Gothas over England

  • 13 June 2017 2-3pm

On 13 June 1917, the German Army launched their first successful raid on London using Gotha bomber aircraft, inflicting the most casualties of any single raid in the First World War.
London required a complete overhaul of its air defences including the introduction of public air raid warnings, air raid shelters and barrage balloons - defences more commonly associated with the Blitz of the Second World War.
Drawing on official documents and eyewitness accounts, Ian Castle will discuss the impact of the first bomber raids on England and their lasting effect.

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/gothas-over-england-tickets-32465181231?aff=culture24

U-boats in the east coast war channels

U-boats in the east coast war channels

  • 15 June 2017 2-3pm

Imagine if there were still bombed-out houses, factories and whole streets wrecked by air raids in the First World War. What lies off the East Coast of Britain is the maritime equivalent. The hundreds of wrecks that remain there from battle are the final resting place of seafarers who have no other grave.
Director of Fjordr, Antony Firth, has been at the forefront of the development of marine archaeology for over 20 years and will discuss this phenomenon in this free talk.

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/u-boats-in-the-east-coast-war-channels-tickets-32465431981?aff=culture24

Forgotten servicemen_West Africa and the First World War

Forgotten servicemen: West Africa and the First World War

  • 17 June 2017 2-3pm

Thousands of colonial subjects from Africa fought on behalf of the Allied Powers in the First World War. British West Africans were recruited to serve in the West African campaigns and West African residents in Britain took up the call to arms.
However, the contribution of West Africa to the war remains largely overlooked. This event examines the neglected history of these servicemen in the First World War.

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/forgotten-servicemen-west-africa-and-the-first-world-war-tickets-32465753944?aff=culture24

Mapping woman's suffrage

Mapping woman’s suffrage

  • 28 June 2017 2-3:30pm

The women’s suffrage campaign in Britain was a particularly long and difficult struggle. It was fought by women and men in cities, towns and villages right across the country.
This talk, featuring suffrage experts Jill Liddington and Elizabeth Crawford, showcases ‘Mapping Women’s Suffrage’, a new digital project which will be launched for the suffrage centenary commemorations in 2018. The project will enable the public to discover the locations of suffrage campaigners across England in 1911.
Supplemented by photographs and biographical snapshots, this talk will illuminate some of the stories of suffrage campaigners at a momentous time in women’s history.

Website

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/mapping-womans-suffrage-tickets-32465853241?aff=culture24

The National Archives
Kew
Surrey
TW9 4DU
England

Website

www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

E-mail

enquiry@nationalarchives.gov.uk

Telephone

020 8876 3444

All information is supplied by the venues or providers themselves and every effort is made to ensure it is correct. Please remember to double check opening hours with the venue concerned before making a special visit.